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Glaucoma Treatment

What is the best treatment for glaucoma?

What is the best treatment for glaucoma?

A variety of options are available to treat glaucoma. These include eye drops, laser procedures, and surgery. All are intended to decrease eye pressure and, thereby, protect the optic nerve. Currently, in the US, eye drops are often the first choice for treating patients.


Can glaucoma be cured?

In general, glaucoma cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. Eye drops, pills, laser procedures, and surgical operations are used to prevent or slow further damage from occurring. With any type of glaucoma, regular eye examinations are very important to detect progression and to prevent vision loss.


What is the first sign of glaucoma?

If the entire optic nerve is destroyed, blindness results. Other symptoms usually are related to sudden increases in IOP, particularly with acute angle-closure glaucoma, and may include blurred vision, halos around lights, severe eye pain, headache, abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.


How long does it take to go blind from glaucoma?

Untreated acute glaucoma results in permanent vision loss. Untreated chronic glaucoma can progress to blindness within several years. Early diagnosis and treatment usually results in excellent success and vision is saved.


Can you have glaucoma in just one eye?

Primary open angle glaucoma generally affects both eyes, but does not always develop at the same time. One eye may have moderate or advanced glaucomatous damage, while the other eye has very little or none. ... Some types of glaucoma such as secondary glaucoma caused by injury to the eye, usually affect one eye.


Can you drive with glaucoma?

Most people with glaucoma can still drive -- as long as they pass the Department of Motor Vehicles' vision test. Simply put, your ability to drive will depend on how much vision has been lost. Some people with advanced glaucoma can still get their license renewed but with restrictions.

Learn More

Glaucoma is treated by lowering your eye pressure (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include prescription eyedrops, oral medications, laser treatment, surgery or a combination of any of these.